Algy loves to perch on a rock beside the sea, just watching the perpetual ebb and flow of the tide. And while the water swirls backwards and forwards beneath his toes, Algy thinks about this and that and the other thing… and about all his amazing Tumblr friends around the world.

Algy knows that quite a few of his Tumblr friends suffer from depression in various forms, more or less severe. For some of his luckier and more carefree friends, smiling comes easily, but for many others it is not so simple. So today Algy is thinking especially of all his friends who do not find it easy to smile. He hopes that his adventures may help bring a smile to your face on the bad days, and that Sadness will leave you soon 🙂

          I pray you, Sadness, leave me soon,
            In sweet invention thou art poor!
          Thy sister Joy can make ten songs
            While thou art making four.

          One hour with thee is sweet enough;
            But when we find the whole day gone
          And no created thing is left –
            We mourn the evil done-

          Thou art too slow to shape thy thoughts
            In stone, on canvas, or in song;
          But Joy, being full of active heat,
            Must do some deed ere long.

          Thy sighs are gentle, sweet thy tears;
            But if thou canst not help a man
          To prove in substance what he feels –
            Then give me Joy, who can.

          Therefore, sweet Sadness, leave me soon,
            Let thy bright sister Joy come more;
          For she can make ten lovely songs
            While thou art making four.

[Algy is quoting the poem Sadness and Joy by the early 20th century Welsh poet William Henry Davies.]

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The Gecko had vanished, and everything seemed normal in the woods again. Algy thought that perhaps his imagination had been playing tricks on him, but then again, he wasn’t quite sure… In any case, he was happy to think that rain was falling on Thierry’s garden now, and the plants would be able to grow lush and green again. As Algy perched on a large branch which had fallen across the burn, he remembered a poem he had once heard:

          I hear leaves drinking rain;
          I hear rich leaves on top
          Giving the poor beneath
          Drop after drop;
          ‘Tis a sweet noise to hear
          These green leaves drinking near.

          And when the Sun comes out,
          After this Rain shall stop,
          A wondrous Light will fill
          Each dark, round drop;
          I hope the Sun shines bright;
          ‘Twill be a lovely sight.

[Algy is quoting the poem The Rain by the early 20th century Welsh poet William Henry Davies.]

As Algy sat on a low, broken branch by the side of the loch in the still of the evening, he thought of the popular poem by the Welsh poet W. H. Davies. Of course Algy prefers to perch on boughs rather than stand beneath them, but he certainly shares the poem’s general sentiment:

          What is this life if, full of care,
          We have no time to stand and stare.

          No time to stand beneath the boughs
          And stare as long as sheep or cows.

          No time to see, when woods we pass,
          Where squirrels hide their nuts in grass.

          No time to see, in broad daylight,
          Streams full of stars, like skies at night.

[Algy is quoting part of the poem Leisure by William Henry Davies.]