Today, many of Algy’s Tumblr friends have been promoting The Landscape Network – a new landscape photography Tumblr which has been looking for submissions and new members of its network. As landscape photography is such a fundamental part of Algy’s adventures, Algy asked his assistant to contact the new network to see whether he might be able to participate. But evidently not everyone likes fluffy birds … The reply was swift but firm:

“Great landscapes, but it’s not really what we’re after I’m afraid, the bird ruins it.”

Poor old Algy! He did feel glum :{  He had never realised that he had been ruining the beautiful local landscapes all this time! So he flew up into an old oak tree and tried not to look too conspicuous, in case there might be any landscape photographers around …

But, fortunately for Algy, fluffy birds do not remain discouraged for very long. He was soon reminded of some lines from Prince Orlovsky’s aria in Die Fledermaus:

          Und fragen Sie, ich bitte.
          Warum ich das denn tu’?
          ’S ist mal bei mir so Sitte,
          Chacun à son goût!

If you enjoy light opera by Johann Strauss, Algy recommends a wonderful and unconventional version of this aria, Ich lade gern mir Gäste, sung by the great tenor Wolfgang Windgassen, from Algy’s favourite DVD version of the opera, recorded in 1972. This is especially dedicated to all of Algy’s lovely German friends :))

When he is quite sure that no-one can hear him, Algy likes to rehearse operatic arias. A fine full moon lit up the old Atlantic oak forest, so Algy found a comfortable perch and sang a song to the moon at the top of his voice.

[Algy suggests that those who prefer a more melodious version might like to listen to Anna Netrebko singing Song to the Moon from Dvorak’s opera Rusalka.]

With a sprinkling of snow on the mountain and the sun very low in the sky, it felt distinctly chilly down at the jetty. Algy decided some vigorous singing might banish the frost. The warmest song Algy could think of was Libiamo ne’ lieti calici, Verdi’s party toast from La Traviata, but despite his enthusiasm he seems to be dragging the beat a wee bit, no doubt as a result of the cold …